When life gives you lemons, draw them, 11 x 14 inches dry pastels, graphite on paper

"When life gives you lemons, draw them". (Nikki)

"Trust your intuition, it's just like goin' fishin'; you cast your line 'til you get a bite." (Paul Simon)

Archive for March, 2009

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Using masking medium

Friday, March 27th, 2009


 

 48 x 24 x 2 inches, central detail

 48 x 24 x 2 inches, masking medium on primed canvas, work in progress 48 x 24 x 2 inches, acrylics on canvas, work in progress  48 x 24 x 2 inches, acrylics on canvas, finished, gallery wrap, sides painted

Grand Fir in front of a giant Sequoia, 48H x 24W x 2D inches acrylics on canvas, using masking medium to outline the mossy dead  branches.

Some work, some don’t, but I haven’t given up on it yet; work still  in progress, but since this won’t be in the Raleigh show in 7 weeks I can’t afford to spend more time on it now.  I hoped the flat white would work against a fairly realistic background, but it doesn’t.   This could go a few ways: 1) flatten the whole surface and make the  painting an abstract  2) downsize the sequoia, add shadow and color to the fir then create a more realistic forest scene 3) block out more dead firs with more masking fluid, echoing the main one, still as an abstract or realistic or 4) ditch it! Some paintings are worth spending time exploring when they reach a certain stage, and with others chalk it up as experience, re-cover the stretcher frame and move on.

Paint Arson

Thursday, March 26th, 2009


 

 Paint Arson, 11 x 11 x 3 inches acrylics on canvas, wrapped sides painted

  Paint Arson, 11 x 11 x 3 inches acrylics on canvas, phase 1 work in progress Paint Arson, 11 x 11 x 3 inches acrylics on canvas, phase 2 work in progress

Paint Arson, 11H x 11W x 3D inches acrylics on canvas, wrapped sides painted: finished, and phases 1 and 2 images.  Most of the Magic Square series are signed on the side, so the signature seen here is superimposed.

Buying a new jar of Cadmium Red medium hue was just the thing to reboot, then re-route some old habits I was falling back into, like over-working paintings. Here I began with a lush Redwood forest in mind, thinking I could safely stir up some inspiration with the hot scarlet under my usual cool green palette… I did not intend to start a fire!
A new color invigorates the work process like nothing else can, and adds renewed life to your results as well. Incorporated as a base, straight out of the tube or mixed with your usual palette, a new color changes everything. Here now, as the painting is seen in the second thumbnail, there’s nothing I can do except follow it and see where it leads. The strength and intensity of this color as a base is dictating a whole other unintended but interesting direction, and it’s in charge for a while. I hope I can manage it.

Painting, whatever the subject may be, is a journey through all kinds of unanticipated thoughts and associations; some are short and sweet, ending within 1 – 6 hours and not much more than a visual, but some are packed full of adventure that isn’t even realized until surfacing from a few hours of work.

The forest fires were still-smoldering when we walked through the Californian Redwood and Sequoia forests last November, and my memory lapses into romanticized imagery of smoky rays of light in the sunset. It’s perplexing that the effects of forest devastation could be so pretty when the fact is that just the week before, a raging fire was the cause of all that beauty, and not just the smoky sunset, but fire enables the entire forest to flourish. As I’m painting this I’m thinking about all kinds of  how fire is a naturally occurring event like rain and snow, and is an essential part of forest cycles…and of how fire is destructive but supports renewal and re-creation as well.
Fire opens pine cones to disperse their seeds, controls pests and disease. By burning weeds and weaker trees that rob sunlight and nutrients from healthier trees and plants, it also clears the way for new seeds to sprout. Ash aerates, and contains properties that determine the quality of soil and what is able to grow there. Realizing that certain trees only regenerate with the aid of fire, like the giant Sequoia cones only release seeds through fire, today’s standard fire management practice is to allow naturally occurring forest fires to burn, still with a mind to sensibly control it.
So what element does it take to spark motivation, opening  a painter’s eyes to new possibilities? A jar of Cadmium Red medium hue!


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Branching Out

Friday, March 20th, 2009


 

  Branching Out, 6H x 6W x 2D inches, Encaustic Conifer, 6H x 6W x 2D inches, Encaustic

Branching Out and Conifer, each 6H x 6W x 2D inches Encaustic, side surfaces also done.

Encaustic is designing/painting with beeswax. I’m not usually intimidated by trying any new medium, but wax is so unique and there are so many possibilities for it, I was a little overwhelmed when I took an introductory course with Deanna Wood. She offers her students workshop days where they can use her supplies to continue experimenting with the medium. Although I’d love to have my own supplies to work at home, the encaustic process is so messy, not to mention expensive to get started, so that is a generous offer.  Today’s studio work produced 4 small encaustic paintings, and 2 are successful. Compared to other media, wax is so versatile it can be scraped off to whatever degree, reworked, layered, carved and manipulated as much or as long as you wish. It’s a lot of fun!


 

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Neighborhood Heron

Thursday, March 19th, 2009


 

Neighborhood Heron, 11H x 11W x 3D inches acrylics on canvas, wrapped sides painted

Neighborhood Heron, 11H x 11W x 3D inches acrylics on canvas started with a base coat of very watered down translucent pthalos green mixed with cerulean blue. Spraying rubbing alcohol over a damp painted water-based surface then allowing it to dry without moving it will create starry, spotty textures. Salt shaken over wet paint allowed to dry, then wiped off with a dry cloth will produce similar effects.

Alcohol loosened up the entire surface of paint, so using fingernails under a damp smooth t-shirt cloth, I rubbed off areas to shape the heron and winter trees. This represents a super argument for the wingin’ it methods!
In college I took a pottery course for one semester, and the thing I remember most is the instructor saying how it’s a good idea to allow some of the raw characters of the materials we work with to remain and “speak” without trying to smooth over and perfect everything. She was of course referring to clay, but over the years I’ve found that it applies to many other mediums also. In Heron, the branches extend into the body of the bird, connecting it to its environment. The effect also does a subtle play on the motion of its flight too.


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Iguana on a Strangler Fig

Wednesday, March 18th, 2009


 

Iguana on a Strangler Fig, 11H x 11W x 3D inches acrylics on canvas, wrapped sides painted

Iguana on a Strangler Fig, Costa Rica, 11H x 11W x 3D inches acrylics on canvas, wrapped sides painted

Earlier progress below. Today layering thin washes of pale yellow, placing the iguana more into the background. Some of the details of the Strangler Fig growth that are now covered up will be brought back into focus since this is more about the tree than the iguana. Posting the painting on the blog is helpful because it’s viewed differently than while painting or studying it..it’s somehow easier to see areas that still need change when looking at it on-screen.

The Strangler Fig is a parasite. Seeds sprout in moss or decaying matter among the branches of rain forest canopies. Roots gradually extend downward and over time completely surround the host tree, which dies while nourishing the Strangler Fig growing in its place.

Strangler Fig and Iguana, phase 1 work in progress Strangler Fig and Iguana, phase 2 work in progress Strangling Fig and Iguana, phase 3 work in progress

March 14th, March 13: above thumbnails, Phases 1, 2 and 3


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Chapala Wind

Tuesday, March 10th, 2009


 

Chapala Wind, 11H x 11W x 3D inches acrylics on canvas, wrapped sides painted

  Chapala Wind, 11 x 11 x 3 inches acrylics on canvas, phase 1 Chapala Wind, phase 2: spraying alcohol, scratching paint

Chapala Wind – Lake Chapala, Mexico, 11H x 11W x 3D inches acrylics on canvas, wrapped sides painted. Thumbnails: phase 1 and 2 in progress.

Sprayed alcohol loosened the paint and I was able to scratch it, at first with my nails and then a pottery tool. Thanks to Karen Xarchos for all the feedback and additional information. We worked together painting murals in Ottawa for a couple of years. Karen has done extensive work in restaurants and homes in the Ottawa area.

Myrtle At The Zoo

Monday, March 9th, 2009


 

Myrtle At The Zoo, Crepe Myrtle Seed Pods and Zebra in January, Fort Worth Zoo, TX - 11H x 11W x 3D inches acrylics on canvas, sides painted

 Myrtle at the Zoo, 11 x 11 x 3 acrylics on canvas, phase 4 bottom side detail

Myrtle At The Zoo – Crepe Myrtle branches and seedpods before pruning, February at the Fort Worth Zoo, Texas. 11H x 11W x 3D inches acrylics on canvas, wrapped sides painted.  Top: finished, center: bottom side painted detail, thumbnails below: work in progress. The signature on most of these ‘magic squares’  is on the side so it is digitally added here.

Myrtle at the Zoo, 11 x 11 x 3acrylics on canvas, phase 1 Myrtle at the Zoo, 11 x 11 x 3acrylics on canvas, phase 2 Myrtle at the Zoo, 11 x 11 x 3acrylics on canvas, phase 3


 

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Decaying Ceiba Leaves

Sunday, March 8th, 2009


 

Decaying Ceiba Leaves, 11H x 11W x 3D inches acrylics on canvas, wrapped sides painted

Ceiba Leaves, Lake Cote Cloud Forest floor, Costa Rica, 11 x 11 x 3 inches acrylics on canvas, work in progress Ceiba Leaves, Phase 2, 11 x 11 x 3 inches acrylics on canvas, work in progress

Decaying Ceiba Leaves, Lake Cote Cloud Forest Reserve, Costa Rica, 11H x 11W x 3D inches acrylics on canvas, wrapped sides painted.

Howler Monkey

Friday, March 6th, 2009


 

Howler Monkey, 11 x 11 x 3 inches acrylics on canvas, sides painted

Howler Monkey, 11 x 11 x 3 inches acrylics on canvas, phase 01 Howler Monkey, 11 x 11 x 3 inches acrylics on canvas, work in progress

Young Howler Monkey at the Dallas World Aquarium, 11H x 11W x 3D inches acrylics on canvas, wrapped sides painted. Work progress shown, scrubbing and scratching away more paint than adding it.


 

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The Visitor: Raccoon

Thursday, March 5th, 2009


 

Raccoon, Ottawa, ON Canada, 11H x 11W x 3D inches acrylics on canvas, wrapped sides painted

The Visitor: Raccoon, 11H x 11W x 3D inches acrylics on canvas, sides painted.

Raccoon, 11 x 11 x 3 inches, acrylics on canvas, work in progress Raccoon, 11 x 11 x 3 inches, acrylics on canvas, work in progress


 

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